May 6, 2015

Insurance for Teens



Adding a young driver to insurance is expensive because they’re so high risk. Per mile, the fatal crash rate for drivers ages 16 to 19 is three times higher than motorists ages 20 or older, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s Highway Loss Data Institute.

Teens’ general lack of experience behind the wheel puts them in a vulnerable position to begin with. They’re also at a higher risk of crashing if driving while impaired or intoxicated, and they tend to drive more recklessly, engage in distracted driving more frequently and wear seat belts at lower rates than older drivers.

Younger people have a bad reputation of being risky drivers and typically face additional scrutiny from insurance carriers. Most carriers check a young driver's record every six months, but won't regularly check an older driver's as these checks can be costly - and older drivers typically are safer drivers.

It’s actually Americans between the ages of 30 and 49 who are the country's most ticketed drivers. Thirty-one percent of 30- to 49-year old have received a ticket for a moving violation in the past five years, compared to 25% of 18- to 29-year-olds.

Drivers under the age of 50 who receive a ticket are much more likely to see their insurance premiums rise than older drivers. In fact, drivers 18-49 years-old are three times more likely to see their insurance premiums rise after receiving a ticket than drivers 50-64 years-old.

While the average annual car insurance premium was $815 in 2012, according to the Insurance Information Institute, residents of some states pay far more. For example, New Jersey’s average premium tops $1,200 per year, or $100 per month.

And low-income drivers often face an insurance penalty just because of where they live. A study released in September by the Consumer Federation of America found that a good driver seeking the state minimum coverage would get an average insurance quote topping $1,000 in 25.5% of the nation’s lowest-income ZIP codes.

In 6.2% of low-income ZIP codes, the average quote for minimum insurance topped $2,000, while only 2.6% of drivers in moderate-income ZIP codes and 0.3% of drivers in upper-income ZIP codes would see such high price quotes. In fact, living in a low-income ZIP code often results in higher rates than having an accident on a driver’s record, the CFA found. And these quotes don’t even include the costs of comprehensive and collision coverage, which generally is required for cars that are financed.





Mar 31, 2015

Dorms Housing Problems

For college students, having a safe, comfortable place to live is an essential part of being able to focus and do good work in school. But whether it's a convenient on-campus dorm or an off-campus apartment, student housing presents challenges that students need to consider before they decide where to live each semester.


 One of the clearest problems in student housing is the need students have to find places to live that are close to campus. On-campus dormitories and apartments offer one solution, but many larger universities have so many students that auxiliary campuses and buses are the only way to provide enough accessible housing.

 High demand for student housing near urban campuses or large schools may cause real estate prices to rise, making nearby apartments and rental houses unaffordable for students. Off-campus housing also places the burden of paying for utility service and commuting to and from campus on the students themselves. For students who take out loans to fund an education, expensive dorms, which may also require students to buy a meal plan to eat on campus, add to graduation debt.

 Dorms are notorious for being cramped, and off-campus student apartments may be no better,
all houses and apartments near urban campuses have really high rent, that is why most of students may not have enough funds to rent them.  Moreover, if you decide to stay at off-campus apartments, you should be ready to pay for the utility service and commuting. Convenience and accessibility. This is the main problem, because students should find the housing place near the campus.

Security and safety. All students should understand: if they decide to live in off-campus apartments, they will lose the safety protection of campus security. That may encounter burglary and theft from their neighborhoods or roommates. Student housing may cause some problems with privacy, because there are a lot of people, who live in a limited place. They should be ready to share bathrooms, study lounges, kitchen and other places with their neighbors or roommates, if they decide to live in a campus.

The Board of Regents recently approved a four percent increase in on-campus housing rates and a five percent increase for meal plans. The money generated by the increase will go toward renovations of on-campus housing and cover the increasing cost of food. While I do understand that up keeping facilities is an important part of running a university, I cannot help being skeptical of the increase.










Aug 20, 2014

The Ins and the Outs of College Move in Day

 

 

You've planned for months, made countless trips to your local Target or Wal-Mart, texted your future roommate about a hundred times and now it's finally here. Move in day is probably the biggest mix of emotions you'll ever experience. Part of you cannot wait to get out on your own and tackle the challenges of the world, the other is still clinging to that small piece of childhood that still remains.



Although it is extremely important to plan, no amount of preparation can make this process easy, especially for first timers.

Plan Ahead


Always make sure you have some sort of checklist when buying room items and when packing them. There is no worse feeling than forgetting something extremely important on the counter-top and having to wait weeks for it to arrive in the mail. For those that are staying close to home this is less important, however you are going to be so busy those first few weeks you won't have time to take a quick trip home.

Another point of emphasis with packing, buy the small stuff on campus. "Small stuff" includes anything from staples to pencils. It will make it so much easier to buy the items you actually need rather than trying to squeeze an entire year of supplies into a box.

We always recommend doing a trial pack-up of whatever vehicle you will be taking. Don't wait for the day of to try and fit everything. This reduces a ton of stress and focuses on the excitement of the day and less on the anxiety that everything will fit.



Timing is Everything


Most schools have designated move in times. Although it is important to follow these, allow yourself time to get through lines, check-ins etc. If any advice can be taken from this post it is to be the first roommate there. The first roommate has essentially all the power on what goes where, what bed to take, which closet space is theirs, etc.

Although if you are the first ones there, we recommend having your parents wait for the others to arrive. This is somebody your child will be living with for the next nine months so it would be nice to establish some sort of relationship with their parents and exchange contact information.

Start Unpacking


Try your best to follow the procedures given to you and always accept help from students assisting with move in. This will not only save lots of time but it helps ease your mind with the help of someone who's been in your shoes previously.

Always start with the big appliances. Those photos and small decorations you can save for the student and their new roommate to set-up. Dads make sure you bring a set of tools because there is always something that needs to be done with the TV, refrigerator, microwave or something alike. Duct tape is a must.

If you're moving in a boy you might just want to make his bed for him one last time because chances are they have no idea the proper way to put on a top sheet, fitted sheet and mattress pad the way he had it at home. The room is now considered your home and you have the right to set it up however you feel. Get creative and move the desks and dressers around to maximize every bit of space you have in that tiny room.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saying Goodbye


Now mom... do not forget to pack at least two boxes of Kleenexes because your little boy or girl has now taken their first steps into adulthood on their own. It is perfectly normal on your way out to shed a few tears. Look to your right, then your left and I guarantee you see about six or seven moms doing the same thing. Also, dad don't try and act like it doesn't affect you because we all know you're hurting on the inside too.

Just a reminder not to hang around too long. Your student is probably itching to get out and make new friends so don't keep them in your grasp too long. Let them enjoy this first feeling of freedom and remind them to call every night (You'll be lucky to get a call once a week). You've worked hard the past 18 years for this moment so enjoy it as much as you can.

Aug 12, 2014

College Visits and Tours: All you need to know



















As mid August approaches high school seniors should already have a good idea on what type of school they want to attend. Now is the time to start planning those exhilarating visits and getting ready for the next chapter of your life.

Your First Steps on Campus


Your first college tour can be a mix of emotions. It may seem intimidating walking across campus when everyone knows you're still in high school, but don't be scared. Every single student has been in the position you're in and some of them probably wish they were you.

It's very important to land a solid tour guide. These visits can easily make or break your decision to attend, so make sure you put them on the spot and ask plenty of questions. Don't be the shy person in the back not listening to a single word they say. Some standard questions for guides are as follows:
  • What is the average class size?
  • What types of programs does the college offer? 
  • How easy it to switch majors?
  • What are the dorms like?
  • What's the food like?
  • What do students do for fun?
  • What are some types of clubs and activities on campus?
  • What specifically are their favorite things about the school?
  • What makes the school unique?

Now one thing you must understand is that these tour guides do not know everything. They are simply just trained students doing this to earn money. So, be sure to set-up meetings with faculty or advisers to ask specific questions concerning graduation rates, job placement, financial aid, specific courses or majors, etc.

Important Things to Remember


Of course talking with students and faculty is important but make sure you are made aware of your surroundings on the tour. Explore the campus and see what is has to offer. Visit the dorms, cafeterias, student unions, classrooms, etc. Imagine yourself in the shoes of the by standing students and feel if it's right for you.

This next tip is extremely important. If you attend a tour with your high school friends do not in anyway let their thinking deter you. Meaning, if you really enjoyed a portion of the school but they did not, don't change your opinions to satisfy theirs. People see and think differently and that is perfectly okay. You shouldn't base your college choice on where all your friends are going anyways, it should be what is the best fit for you personally. Although your parents may know best for you, don't let them shut you down on a school you love as well.



It may seem like going for a tour on the weekend or in the summer would be easiest, but we definitely don't recommend it. Of course there will still be people, but there's no more real experience than seeing a college while class is in session. Take a morning off school with your parents and go visit the school during the week. It's the only way to see a university in it's natural setting. High school teachers are mostly understanding when it comes to this and consider it an excused absence.


Also, do not let horrible tour guides crush your dream school. As mentioned above, they are simply students paid essentially minimum wage just trying to make a little extra money. If you fell in love with the school on paper but didn't have a great experience it is definitely recommended to request another tour. As a matter of fact, before choosing which school you are going to attend it should be an absolute minimum of two trips. Application deadlines are usually in December but that does not mean you have to make a decision quite yet.

Overall, enjoy the tour experience and what is has to offer but do not forget to enjoy that last year of high school because before you know it it'll be over.  


Jul 25, 2014

The Scary Act of Random Room Assignments

So you've just received your room assignment for the upcoming fall...what do you do next?

 


 Don't always judge a book by its cover


The absolute first thing you will do once you receive your housing assignment will be to immediately check out your roommate. Delve into their lives through any sort of social media, Google searches, anything you can find. Just because you've seen everything the internet has to offer about your new friend does not mean you know who they are by any means. So, in midst of all your Facebook creeping remember to keep an open mind and don't let their profile formulate an opinion about the person prior to even meeting them.

Find their contact information

Absolutely do not hesitate to contact your new roommate, you may be nervous at first but it's a must. Of course it will always start out extremely awkward with basic questions like "so what did you do for fun in high school?" "Did you play any sports?" and a hundred other random questions. You should really try to escalate the conversation after some time and actually get to know them. After all, you're going to be spending nine long months trapped in a small room with this person. Make sure you pick up on things like how they like to spend their weekends, if they're alright with having other friends over, what their sleep schedule is like, etc.

Who's bringing what?

This could be the most important conversation you have before move-in day. Sorting out the who has what and who should buy this can make your life a whole lot easier and cheaper. Items to collectively think about:


  • Refrigerator
  • Microwave
  • TV/Stand
  • Futon/Couch (Highly recommend you don't bring a couch, as it is impossible to move in and out)
  • Gaming System or DVD player 

 Other than those big items, the rest should be planned on your own. Yes, maybe some stuff will overlap but you would certainly rather have more than less. Make sure to have a checklist of materials when shopping, this will make it less stressful come the first day of school. Also, enjoy the "newness" experience that comes with college and a random roommate. They don't always have to be your best friend, sometimes it's just easier living with someone who you can tolerate and never have a problem with.

Jul 15, 2014

TwinXL.com Student Bedding Service

 

 

 

Easy Way for Schools to Raise Money!


Here at TwinXL.com we decided to start a new service that not only helps students locate the perfect linens for them but to serve the schools that these students travel to. This opportunity is perfect for any school across the country seeking to generate a little extra revenue for anything from dorm upgrades to student programming. A lot of schools today put the responsibility of the student/parents to provide their own linens. This service allows schools to still stray from that responsibility but to keep the profits that come with it. The program is virtually hassle-free and requires little to nothing on the school's behalf. Our staff will handle everything from order placement, shipping, payment processing, returns, you name it! The program is completely customizable to fit the school's needs and wants.

Colleges and Boarding Schools Included


We may talk a lot about college on this website but we are fully aware of the Boarding School system and their use of size Twin/ Twin XL bedding. This fundraising opportunity would be perfect for big or small schools and we can adjust to whatever fits the school.This might even be a better opportunity for boarding school student's because they will be able to keep the bedding throughout their college years!

Start Raising Money Today!


If this seems like something your school would be interested in, or if you just want to learn a little more about the program please don't hesitate to contact us from our homepage. We would love to answer any questions you may have. Remember the earlier you contact us, the faster you can start raising money for the upcoming year and implementing all those big plans for the fall!



Jul 8, 2014

TwinXL.com Offers Gift Registry for College Bound Students

 

 

 

"Add to Registry"


This is something you will start noticing on every product that is featured on TwinXL.com. This might seem unusual because you've probably only seen this type of thing for weddings and baby showers however, now future and current college students have the option to add products to their "wishlist" year round to make shopping easy for family and friends!

How does it work?


TwinXL.com uses a partner named Wishpot, where the student simply creates a free account and starts adding any products they desire. They are the top free gift registrar and harbor much more than just TwinXL.com products. The "add to registry button" is located on each product page directly to the right of "add to cart" so it is conveniently placed. This button will bring you directly to to the link, where you would create an account then search for the student's list by their name. Search among their products and find what type of TwinXL bedding they're interested in and there you go! Wishpot
also has plenty of different features that allows you to differentiate what products are their favorites exactly and allows the students to share their lists on social media.

Perfect Graduation Gift


Now that it's mid-July, still unsure of what designs or color bedding a high school senior would like? Stressing out trying to find them a gift without directly asking? Then this is perfect. Shop from plenty of comforters, mattress pads, sheets, pillows, etc. all the while getting the exact products the person wants. Surprise the grad with a brand new  Catalina Ivy Union 5-Piece Premium Dorm Twin XL Bedding Set and steal the spotlight from all the boring money-givers. We promise the grad will surely appreciate the creativity!




Remember if you ever have any questions about the specifics of our products please don't hesitate to ask!


Jun 12, 2014

Dorm Room Essentials Checklist






Figuring out just what to bring to college might be the single most stressful thing that any college student goes through. How do you pack an entire 18 years of your life into one room, or better yet.....half of one room. We've put together this checklist to try and relieve some of the stress, enjoy.

 

 

 

 

Bedroom

Alarm Clock/Cell Phone: Always make sure you have a tool to wake you up in the morning for those dreaded 8AM classes. We recommend keeping it out of reaching distance to avoid shutting it off in your sleep.

Calendar/Bulletin Board: One of the most difficult things in college is staying organized. Use these to keep track of homework, tests or big events.

Clothing/Hangers: Well this one might seem pretty obvious. Try not to bring your whole closet, most likely the closet you'll be sharing is much smaller than the one you have at home.

Computer: If you have the money, a laptop can be the best investment you can make in college. It will save so much time, especially since a lot of classes are moving towards a mixture of classroom/web-based set-up.

Desk Lamp: This is necessary for the night owls who try to get everything done before the midnight deadline.

Fan: A lot of dorms don't have the luxurious air conditioning your used to at a home. Get a fan, you can thank me later.

Laundry Basket: This one might also seem obvious, get something that is durable and that you can carry up three flights of stairs. But also try and find one that you can stash away or keep under the bed.

Linens: Always check what size bed the dorms have ahead of time. If you're looking for Twin XL bedding we might know a place.... TwinXL.com. Definitely bring your own sheets, comforter, pillows/pillowcases and mattress pad. Because laundry can be a hassle you might just want to bring two sets of sheets.

Movies/Television/Games: You're going to have a lot of down time in college be sure to bring a DVD player or game console.

Posters/Pictures: This small room is your home for the next 9 months so make it your own! Bring plenty of pictures, posters, decorations that show who you are and are pleasant to look at.

Seating: Friends aren't all going to want to pile on the ground or lay in your bed. Invest in a futon, or other types of seating. One tip: Couches are way too big and can be a hassle moving in and out.

Bathroom

Bath linens: Make sure to get a few sets of towels, wash cloths, etc.

Flip-flops: This may sound silly. But trust me if you're sharing a public bathroom, you want flip flops.

Shower caddy: Rather than trying to juggle your shampoo, conditioner, shaving cream, etc. Purchase a shower caddy/shower tote it makes the trip much easier.

Toiletries: These aren't super necessary because you can purchase them anywhere on campus at any time.

Kitchen

Appliances: Make sure to check with your school on what is allowed then coordinate with your roommate on the big things. Most notably the fridge and microwave.

Bowls, Cups, "Silverware", etc: Make sure to have these handy in case you have a craving for a snack and the dining hall is closed. We recommend you buy all plastic because washing dishes with no kitchen handy is annoying.

Food: If your parents ever ask you if you need food, you say YES! If you don't you will absolutely regret it. There is no such thing as too much food for a college student. Make sure to have your drawers stacked with snacks.

Water Pitcher: One of the most underrated, amazing, money saving items you can invest in is a water filtered pitcher. After buying several 24-packs of bottled water I purchased one of these and saved a ton of money.

Other Items

Important Papers: Bring a copy of your birth certificate, passport and financial aid information, especially if you live far away from your school. It will save a lot of time and hassle trying to get your parents to mail it to you.

Medications/First Aid Kit: Lets hope you never have to use it but always bring a first aid kit just to be safe. Also, if you're doctor requires you to take certain medications make sure you plan out ahead of time where your new pharmacy is going to be.

Door Decorations: Whether it be a whiteboard and marker or some pictures and stickers, stand out to the rest of the hall and see just how many friends you make. 

Feeling better?

Hopefully this helps relieve a little stress. Remember to plan ahead of time but a lot of the smaller stuff you can purchase at school so try not to worry about getting everything down to a pack of staples.



Jun 4, 2014

Big School vs. Small School

 What's best for you?






































You're in your senior year of high school, now its time to plan out the rest of your life...seems impossible right? Where does the search for college even start? Well the first step is choosing whether or not you want to attend a big university, small school, or somewhere in between.


Big Schools

University of Minnesota: home to over 51,000 students

You might ask, just how big...is big? A normal state school is anywhere from 20,000 students to 50,000. Looking at this number it might be a little overwhelming but there are some things to consider. Such as the number of undergraduates vs. graduate students, or how many students are in your specific department. Some schools separate themselves into sub-colleges to the point where their class sizes are no different from the small schools.

Benefits:
  • Diverse groups of people
  • Wide variety of majors and programs
  • More acclaimed sports programs and nationally televised events
  • State-of-the-art facilities
  • Tons and tons of activities and student groups
  • Highly touted faculty
  • More housing opportunities

If you're looking to extend past those boundaries of high school and looking to explore new opportunities then a big school might be just right for you. One thing to consider when admitting to a large university, is that it can be easy to get lost in the crowd during classes. You should be prepared to put yourself out there to connect with your peers and professors.If you're okay with having hundreds of classmates during that first year of introductory courses, then you'll do just fine at a big school.

Small Schools


Well if those numbers start to freak you out to the point of hyperventilation... you might want to consider a much smaller school and THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH THAT. That is the first misconception of smaller universities, that without the big name diploma you won't be successful. This could not be further from the truth. The best way to succeed is finding the perfect fit for you to not only grow your academic knowledge but your personal self.

Lets take a look at some benefits to a smaller school:
  • Small class sizes
  • Individually designed programs and majors
  • More individual attention from faculty
  • Sense of community
  •  Not as much reliance on teaching assistants
  • Stronger connection between peers
So you're not huge into the sports or giant social scenes but are looking to make connections with individuals for lifelong friendships then a small school is perfect for you. You're professors will know your first name, you'll recognize just about everybody that you walk past at the school all forming a sense of community that a big school lacks. 

 

Well I'm Not Either???


Now you might be thinking well I want the social scene of a big school but I want the more hands on learning from a smaller school... Then you are right in between. These schools hover between that 10,000-20,000 student mark. There are tons and tons of schools like this whether they're private or public. These schools thrive off the medium and offer their students countless opportunities. If you're confused about what environment you prefer, then you might just be an intermediary which is awesome as well.

The most important thing to consider when choosing a college is what is the right fit? Where do you see yourself prospering? If you can answer those two questions then you will be just fine. College is a special time and try not to waste any of it because it's going to fly by. So good luck future grads and we hope where ever you land is the perfect fit.

May 29, 2014

Ship Your Sheets - College Humor Video


Ship Your College XL Sheets!

Shopping for college couldn't be easier. Select from the finest quality dorm bedding collection, in hard to find twin XL dorm bed size, and we ship them right to your door. No hassle or limited twin XL options, a big collection of top notch extra long bedding.
Check out http://www.twinxl.com
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